Attention iPhone users: iOS 15.0 through 15.2.x contain bugs that affect the auto-open feature. Versions above or below work fine.

Open/Close Switch

Comments

6 comments

  • Official comment
    Scott Riesebosch

    Jeff,

    That is certainly possible, but from our perspective there are hundreds of different models of garage door openers and the skill level of customers varies widely. Our concern would be that if we started down that road, customers would be required to open up their garage door openers to access the internal limit switches (if they even exist).

    Our gate customers actually do this. It takes more knowledge, but can be done.

    We try to make Tailwind as universal as possible.

    If you would like to give it a try with your opener you're certainly welcome. The internal circuitry for the door sensor is pretty standard stuff. It has a weak, small DC voltage applied. You can see it with any DC volt meter. When the sensor closes it shorts it to ground (the second wire of the door sensor). The only way you could damage the iQ3 controller would be to apply a reverse voltage to the door sensing input, or apply a voltage that is larger than 5V to the input.

    Scott

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  • Jeff V

    Sure... I have a Genie Excelerator.

    To use the existing close limit switch, I cut off the magnetic switch that came with the Tailwind device, leaving a couple of feet of wire. I put the black wire on terminal 5 (limit switch common) and the red wire on terminal 6 (close limit switch).  Note: Prior to installation, I used a voltmeter to verify the voltage and polarity across terminals 5 and 6 was 5 volts or less to ensure it wouldn't damage the Tailwind device as Scott instructed.

    The Tailwind device (blue & brown wires) was added to terminals 1 and 2 in parallel with the wall switch as usual. I shortened the wire on this one as well.

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  • Jeff V

    Thanks for the helpful info. My garage unit was just under 5 volts so I installed it with the existing limit switch no problem... Yay for a 5 minute install with virtually no wires!

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  • Scott Riesebosch

    Jeff,

    Glad to hear it worked out for you. Can you post any pictures of what you did? I'm sure other customers would love to see how you did it, and what model of opener you have.

    Scott

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  • Scott Riesebosch

    Jeff,

    Yes that is a brilliant solution for your particular type of Garage Door opener! Nicely done!

    Scott

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  • G. Mobley

    This was very cool.  I found it a bit late though.  My solution with a Genie Excelerator Opener was to obtain a 2nd Genie door sensor that goes at the end of the screw track.  I installed it on the opposite side of the rail to the Genie sensor and ran the cable back to the main motor along the top of the track beside the main genie sensor wire. 

    https://www.amazon.com/Genie-Excelerator-Close-Switch-33950S/dp/B00283OBXY/ref=sr_1_38?keywords=genie+door+sensor&qid=1577034632&s=beauty&sr=8-38

    I then glued a small magnet on the other side of the trolley right under the genie sensor (like the default trolley sensor does)and voila... nice neat install without using the supplied magnetic sensor which mounts to the track very cleverly.  

     

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